Oregon State Turns “Likes” into Engagement – EverTrue

This blog post is a repost of an article shared by EverTrue customer Oregon State University:

KAREN OLDFIELD’S ENGAGING STORY

Just this past week, the President of the Our Beaver Nation Advisory Board, Karen Oldfield reached and surpassed a rather unique milestone. She became our first donor to amass over 10,000 reactions (likes, comments, shares, etc.) on Oregon State-related Facebook accounts. She also became the first with over 1,500 comments to Beaver-related posts on the social media platform.

In days past, someone who was as connected to her alma mater as Karen is would chat about it on the phone, via email, in person or even by letter. Now, donors like Karen and her family have the immediate opportunity to voice their love for the Orange & Black.

Karen and her family are Beavers through and through. She, her two brothers, and her father all attended Oregon State. Her husband, Dick, was a student-athlete on the men’s track team at OSU. His four siblings also attended and his father was a professor at the university. Karen and Dick’s two children, Alex and Emily, and their daughter-in-law Ashley, all recently graduated from OSU as well. To say there is an affinity for Oregon State in the Oldfield household would be an understatement, but a question must be asked.

“It lets us know when our football game times have been determined, what color uniform the teams will be wearing for that game, parking information, any changes to the game day experience and how to watch the game on TV if you can’t get to Reser. I feel like Facebook serves our generation more so than Instagram, Twitter or Snapchat.  I think my generation is comfortable with it,” commented Karen.

Karen spreads the wealth in terms of interactions across all OSU-related accounts on Facebook. Since her first engagement with an Oregon State account on September 7, 2010, Karen has been engaging at a rate of just under four reactions per day. She has reacted to or commented on 15 Oregon State Athletics-based accounts with 25.9% of the reactions pointed towards Oregon State Baseball.

“I want all the student-athletes and all the teams to know that there are people out there that care about them and what they do.  The time they spend on the practice fields, doing their community service and making sure that their studies are top priority, sometimes a GO BEAVS, can give them a little boost,” Karen added. “And, not just the athletes, but their coaches, weight staff, trainers and all who support the student-athletes and OSU teams. If someone new to Facebook sees that I react a lot to OSU posts, maybe they will as well.”

Facebook is not the only way Karen engages with Oregon State Athletics. She has been a member of the OBN Advisory Board for the past eight years and recently was elevated to President. She and her family attend Beaver athletic and special events throughout the year, holding season tickets for three sports.

The Oldfield family’s generosity in terms of their investment in our student-athletes’ collective futures is immeasurable. They care about each and every one of them, no matter if they’ve met in person or not.

What’s not to  50538  about that?

Oregon Springs 17 v1.0.0.0 FS17

Welcome to Oregon Springs. The base of the map is made from Google Earth and changed a bit to make it more enjoyable for the game. This is my first American styled map and originally built for Farming Simulator 15, but it was released in the last 2 weeks before Farming simulator 17 came out. So i decided to bring the map to Farming Simulator 17, i hope you all enjoy the map and feel free to give me some feedback to improve the map. All the base functions from the game are in the map, the only thing is there is only 1 field where you can use the missions system and this is field 5. This is because of the shapes of the fields. This version is for PC only because of the script. I would like to thank all the modders for there objects that i used, and the people in our team for testing the map. The map has all the base fs17 functions. Custom crops with new textures, Multi Terrain Angle added, Changed environment.xml and Chopped Straw is added. There are 3 different farms for the animals. 4 crops selling points. 2 Contractor areas and one of them has an extra storage for crops. Biogas. gardencenter. chicken farm where you can sell grass, hay and straw. Sawmill and on the same terrain you can sell your wood chips. Live stock market. Vehicle shop. And next to the ”trainstation” you can sell your logs and wood.

The post Oregon Springs 17 v1.0.0.0 FS17 appeared first on Farming Simulator 2017 mods, LS 2017 mods, FS 17 / 2017 mods.

Built Oregon -Oregon’s Entrepreneurial Digital Magazine

The story of Oregon’s successful Chivaz Wear started in — of all places — Silicon Valley.

Matt Gilman was working at various video game and app startups in the Bay Area, where he found himself spending an enormous amount of time and effort building other people’s dreams and ideas. After years of working for others, he learned how the system worked and those insights led to a realization: he didn’t like working for other people._X4A0135

Inspired by a goat

The initial idea for Chivaz Wear came when Matt had a few extra dollars and wanted to upgrade his wardrobe, with an emphasis on unique socks that didn’t fall down.

“I always liked wearing long socks with shorts, but in 2006, the only long socks available were tube socks that came in multipacks and other ‘stylish’ socks from places like The Gap that had poor quality and uninspiring design,” he said. “Socks that fall down are called quitters, which is something I learned that from a Canadian friend growing up. I am not a quitter, nor will I create something that would be considered a quitter.”

The initial spark was expanded by a chance encounter with a goat..

“At this same time, I met this goat named Chiva (Spanish word for goat). She was the first goat that I ever really got to be around for more than just a quick looksee. She had a strong personality, and spent most of her day standing on a surfboard, surveying her expansive world, from the middle of my friend’s tree.”

So how did the combination of socks and a goat came together to launch a brand? As an independent person himself, the connection made perfect sense to Matt. He put a stake in the ground to make unique and high quality socks that were an expression of not only the independent and awesome spirit he saw in Chiva, but how he felt in the world.

“In my mind, goats represented so many things I saw as part of the brand; Independent flexible, adaptable, crafty, wiry, bearded and/or horned, great on their feet (sure footed), always trying to escape their pen, will eat anything, will not sacrifice their personality, friends to many, and unique.”

But the transition from a concept to an actual company can get a bit messy and complicated – especially when it comes to a consumer products brand. As a number of consumer product founders do, Matt took to Kickstarter.

“I had no money, so I floated the idea out there and I got a ton of pre-orders: $20,000 worth. That money allowed me to order the socks and start selling them. Without Kickstarter, I would have had to find some type of financing and no one in Silicon Valley was interested in hearing about small sock companies. I was hoping to raise $7,500 because I would have chipped in another $7,500 to get the initial order actually made. When I reached $20,000 I couldn’t believe it.”

It took Matt quite a while to find a reliable and quality focused manufacturer that understood the type of product he wanted to create, and wouldn’t cut corners or rush things. The socks had to hold their elasticity (wouldn’t fall down), kept their color, wouldn’t be too hot, and most importantly felt awesome when you put them on.

“I have drawings from 2007 showing my socks with a label on each sock and my goat logo loud and clear. I had several manufacturers that I prototyped with that I found through Alibaba. No one was giving me what I wanted, and the struggle through translation was obvious. I don’t know how to speak Chinese and they didn’t know how to speak English, and everything suffered as a result. After almost giving up, I ran into a friend of mine from Taiwan and he told me about his cousins who had once dealt with a good manufacturer there. I got in touch and immediately I knew that these people were professionals. We probably ran through another 10 prototypes before arriving at the right mix of materials and colors and price. I haven’t looked elsewhere since. “

With the manufacturing lined up, he turned his focus to the designs. From the outset Matt knew he wanted to have three designs with goats on them as a way to build his own IP. In his mind, anyone can make a striped sock, but not just anyone can make a goat sock. However, the realities of the marketplace and consumers had to be balanced with a unique IP.Copy of IMG_3852

Designing to differentiate

Beyond the initial logo design, Matt has mostly just used his own soul to come up with the designs, and with no art background, he still creates the socks in an old school way – with paper and colored pencils. He also doesn’t really look at other company’s designs, and as a result, there is a uniqueness that is simply inspired by goats, colors, nature and the environment around me.

“ More people initially like stripes more than goats, so I created nine styles that were all over the map to see what people actually wanted…unfortunately I ordered a bit too many of a few styles and was sitting on inventory for longer than i wanted. It was a great learning process though.The second phase of Chivaz has been a bit different. I ordered smaller quantities and styles, but they are selling faster. There is still a lot to be dialed in when it comes to the styling.”

Integrated into the styling and production are a few hidden features like the “get goatin” on the inside of each cuff, the cloven hoofprint on the bottoms, and the reflective embroidery on the back of each calf. These subtle elements harken back to the original idea genesis, but also help to define the brand.

As with most creative founders, he does have one that he’s particularly connected to.

“ I’m most proud of my current Black and White Chivaz sock. Not only does it have the Chivaz brand front and center, which I hope will serve as a reminder to the person wearing them to “get goatin’” and find their inner goat, but they also are two different socks with the same design. This goes even deeper with the brand and the message that I am trying to spread – that something that looks opposite, might actually be the same.”

You can learn more about the black and white sock via this Medium post Matt wrote.

Growing the company in Central Oregon

Matt moved out of the Bay Area because he wasn’t thriving there or growing like he wanted to as a person. He found that life was too busy and full of things that he didn’t always enjoy doing, and the general quality of life was a constant sense of pressure.

“ Sitting in traffic, absurd day care prices,  and some uninspiring companies that I had worked at led a general sense of dismay. Chivaz was on hiatus because I just couldn’t keep doing that and a full time job with a long commute. So when I moved to Redmond, it was conscious decision between my wife and I to change our lifestyle and get back to doing things that felt naturally good. Seeing beautiful nature, hiking, biking, meeting people, learning new perspectives, and understanding how to live without an income – which is still tough!”

2016 was a huge year of growth for Matt and his family, which is something he attributes to the environment that Oregon has to offer.  Their rent went from $4300/month to $1500/month, a drastic change that gave them the room to make some mistakes – mistakes that would have really hindered them in the Bay Area.

“In the Bay Area I had no more room for mistakes. I would go into debt immediately between any jobs, so that had to keep all of my focus – instead of my own well being, my family, my creativity and my business, but what we found in Bend was an awesome and welcoming community.”

Matt didn’t know what he was going to do for work after he moved to Redmond, so he started to network in Bend. He met  Preston Calicott from Five Talent and thought the meeting would be a good one because he thought it could lead to a job or at the least introduce him to a couple of people and teach him about the area. The two of them started chatting about different companies and Matt kept droning on about random stuff. However, the conversation took an immediate turn when it switched to socks.

“We started talking about socks and I immediately changed my attitude. He basically said that I shouldn’t work for others if I really wanted to do socks. He was a bit harsh and honest with me, which was something I hadn’t heard in ages – so I welcomed it after wiping away my tears. What a blessing. He then introduced me to Gary Bracelin & Eric Meade of Bend Outdoor Worx and I just kept going out and trying to meet people on my own after that. I would just walk into different stores with a bag of socks and my story and start talking. I couldn’t believe it, but people actually had time for me.”

What Matt found in Bend was a similar tribe of people. There is a big group of people who do their own thing, so they seemed to know what he was going through, and more importantly, everyone has been supportive of the mission that he is on and stoked that he is bringing a new product to town.

The community and environment led to the creation of a new design, the Cascadia sock. The concept is based around a simple belief; Central Oregon is an awesome mixture of nature, independent spirits, local love, pioneering heritage, and the ability to see past boundary lines and into what brings us together as a people.

“I had no idea what Cascadia was when I moved here and now I am so proud to be a part of this community. I only made 200 of those socks and I am selling them quicker than I thought. Honestly, I feel like I am just lucky to be the first company to make a really good quality sock with this design that obviously came from someone else. I have learned that people also buy based on what they know and people who recognize that design love the design.I’d like to get these socks at some retailers in other areas of Cascadia, so if anyone out there knows of any, please send them my way – retail is still not my strong suit.”

One of the biggest challenges facing Matt and Chivaz is around spreading the “gospel of the goat,” but that could also be seen as an opportunity, one that he is slowly realizing every day.

“People keep saying they wear their Chivaz doing different activities like yoga, skiing, biking, running hiking, CrossFit, boomerang throwing, painting, cooking, and on and on. I haven’t had a chance to really dive deep into any of those segments. What I’d really like to do is get in good with other local entrepreneurs that are hustling like me and make make some co-branded socks, but I haven’t been able to build the relationships or work out the math quite yet.”

The bottom line is that Matt can’t wait to make more socks that will inspire and remind people to tap into their inner-goat. To get people believing in themselves and their own personalities and to embrace the differences that make each of us unique. To, as he puts it, “Get goatin!”

For more information, visit . You can also like them on facebook and follow them instagram.ChivazHats1-26

Source

http://builtoregon.com/2017/01/inspired-by-a-goat-the-chivaz-wear-story/

Steep Hill Expands To Oregon

Steep Hill Expands To Oregon

Last week, Steep Hill announced they are expanding into Oregon with a laboratory in Portland. According to the press release, the company has licensed its testing technology to Dr. Carl Balog, a renowned pain and addiction physician.

Steep Hill has expanded significantly over the past year, including new laboratories in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Washington D.C. and Hawaii, among other states. The Berkeley-based company works in lab testing, research and development, licensing, genetics and remote testing. In 2008, Steep Hill opened the first-ever commercial cannabis-testing laboratory in the country.

Jmîchaeĺe Keller, president and chief executive officer of Steep Hill, says this is a development that will help them better understand cannabis chemistry and its medical applications. “We are pleased to announce our expansion into Oregon and especially pleased to partner with Dr. Balog, a physician who brings years of pain and addiction experience to the Steep Hill body of expertise,” says Keller. “In addition, Dr. Balog plans to use his specialized knowledge to aid Steep Hill’s research and development efforts to broaden our understanding of cannabis chemistry and to explore its wider medical applications. In partnering with Dr. Balog, we hope that Steep Hill will be able to help physicians around the United States to curb the opioid epidemic by offering Steep Hill Verified™ medicinal cannabis as an alternative to a crisis that plagues this country.”

Examination of cannabis prior to testing- credit Steep Hill Labs, Inc.

Dr. Balog, now owner and medical director of Steep Hill Oregon, says medical cannabis could be an excellent harm reduction tool, and hints at it being a possible tool in the opioid crisis. “I deal with the consequences of the opioid epidemic on a daily basis as a pain and addiction specialist,” says Dr. Balog. “The growing trend of using cannabis products as an alternative to opioids highlights the need for regulated testing. Because of the variability of marijuana preparations, testing ensures that scientific rigor is applied in a standardized way. I am dedicated to ensuring that patients have access to safe, tested cannabis, free from contaminants and to verified labels that can be trusted for their content.”

They expect Steep Hill Oregon to be open for business in the second quarter of 2018.

Why We’re Planting Oregon Trees in Washington

Tackling climate change requires a new toolkit of tactics. That’s why the Greenway Trust is teaming up with local partners to trial new habitat restoration methods designed to increase resiliency to climate change for Western Washington forests.

The testing ground will be Stossel Creek, a 154-acre parcel of land northeast of Carnation in the Tolt Watershed, which was purchased by the City of Seattle in 2015 through City Light’s Endangered Species Act Early Action Plan. The Greenway Trust, Seattle City Light, Seattle Public Utilities, and the Northwest Natural Resource Group recently received a $140,000 grant to undertake this trial from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) through its Climate Adaptation Fund, a program that is supported and established by a grant to WCS from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.

Stossel Creek presents a unique opportunity to trial new methods to build resilience to climate change. Like many forests in Western Washington, the ecosystem is disturbed. Trees on the site were harvested by a private company in 2012. Since then, the site has partially regenerated on its own, but with limited trees and other vegetation. Invasive species have taken hold in some areas. It needs to be reforested, but the question is: With what?

Over the next two years, Greenway staff will work with contractors, AmeriCorps members, and volunteers to plant native conifer species, such as Douglas fir and Western redcedar. Instead of using only subvarieties native to Washington, they will also include trees sourced from southwestern Oregon that are better adapted to warmer temperatures and drier summers. Over the years, the success of each variety will be analyzed and compared to its neighbors. Ultimately, project partners hope to determine which variety is most resilient to the changing climate forecast for the Tolt Watershed.

“The climate of the Stossel Creek area is projected to be similar to southwest Oregon by the end of the 21st century,” explains Crystal Raymond, Climate Adaptation Specialist for City Light. “Therefore, the trees adapted to southwestern Oregon are expected to be better suited to the Stossel Creek site as the climate warms. By increasing the tree genetic and species diversity, the site’s resiliency to climate change will increase over time.”

This pilot project will inform future climate-adapted restoration practices for lands owned by City Light, Seattle Public Utilities, and other forest owners in the region. The long-term goal of the reforestation effort is to establish a late seral forest that will be adapted to the climate of the mid to late 21st century, an innovative approach of adapting to the impending effects of climate change in the region.

Work to control invasive plant species will begin this spring and tree planting will begin in the fall. After planting, the team will have several opportunities to monitor success and communicate lessons learned from the project. Stay tuned for more information about ways to get involved and initial findings!

Priority Areas:
Snoqualmie River Valley
Post Categories:
Conservation, Press Release

Source

https://mtsgreenway.org/blog/why-were-planting-oregon-trees-in-washington/